What You Need To Know About The Dakota Oil Pipeline And The Native Americans Trying To Stop It

The pipeline would transport millions of gallons of crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois each day. But Native Americans and environmentalists have slammed the project as a threat to sacred sites and nature.

The Dakota Access Pipeline is designed to carry almost 20 million gallons of oil across the Midwest every day. But the project is being fiercely opposed by Native American tribes, who argue it will disturb historic and sacred sites — the governor has called in the National Guard after tense standoffs.

The Dakota Access Pipeline is designed to carry almost 20 million gallons of oil across the Midwest every day. But the project is being fiercely opposed by Native American tribes, who argue it will disturb historic and sacred sites — the governor has called in the National Guard after tense standoffs.

Andrew Cullen / Reuters

Now, on Friday, a judge is set to issue a ruling that could continue, stop, or delay the pipe's construction.

When finished, the 30-inch underground pipes will stretch 1,172 miles and carry 470,000 barrels of crude oil per day. The US Geological Survey estimates there are 7.4 billion barrels of “undiscovered, technically recoverable oil” at the pipeline’s starting point in North Dakota. So the idea is to get that oil out of the ground and to refineries and markets in other parts of the US.

When finished, the 30-inch underground pipes will stretch 1,172 miles and carry 470,000 barrels of crude oil per day. The US Geological Survey estimates there are 7.4 billion barrels of "undiscovered, technically recoverable oil" at the pipeline's starting point in North Dakota. So the idea is to get that oil out of the ground and to refineries and markets in other parts of the US.

Energy Transfer Partners

Energy Transfer Partners — the Texas-based company behind the pipe — said the $3.7 billion project will create up to 12,000 construction jobs.

Energy Transfer Partners — the Texas-based company behind the pipe — said the $3.7 billion project will create up to 12,000 construction jobs.

Andrew Cullen / Reuters


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